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jhansolo
Dear Bros,

I have experienced many times the air line slip off from my rena 200 air pump. Anyone experience this? I'm using the ones that Darwin sell blue color soft airline, should I change them?
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(jhansolo @ Wed 11 Aug 2004 10:52 am)
Dear Bros,

I have experienced many times the air line slip off from my rena 200 air pump.  Anyone experience this?  I'm using the ones that Darwin sell blue color soft airline, should I change them?
*

If I guess correctly, the "blue soft" airline tubing you are using is the newer type made of silicon. Those typical clear harder ones are made of plastic (of some sort.)

The silicon type, I find better in staying connected. They were made specifically to stay soft (and hence huggy) instead of harden up over-time and lose the grib.

So I'm guessing (again!?) that the fault may lies in your Rena's air-outlet tip. Is the tip oily and so slippery? Use some thinner to carefully remove the oil if you can.

I like the silicon type so much I have totally abandoned the plastic type (which I need to replace ever so often when it hardens.)

Cheers.
HappyBuddha
... more

Does the air pumping out from the Rena flow freely? It could be your airstone is clogged and the back-pressure created is so great the connection slips.
desireless
But the soft type a bit smelly leh... got the burnt rubber smell... I feel skeptical putting the tube in the water ohmy.gif
top_view_ranchu
QUOTE(desireless @ Wed 11 Aug 2004 02:05 pm)
But the soft type a bit smelly leh... got the burnt rubber smell... I feel skeptical putting the tube in the water  ohmy.gif
*


Bro, me too leh!
After putting it on, the smell on my hand remind me of some rubbery stuff blush.gif
But as HB mentioned, the tight feeling make me feel good! shiok.gif
CyberET
i just buy one whole roll of clear plastic
use and throw biggrin.gif
desireless
one roll of 100m $8 nia! Cheap cheap!! good_very.gif
CP
Rena....expensive but well worth the money spent.Super quiet.
IMHO the primary cause of slipping is due to backpressure caused by dirty airstones.Furthermore,you may notice that the pump hums louder when trying to force air thru a clogged airstone.
After cleaning,before slipping on the air tube simply snip off the part that was previously attached to the inlet as that portion is likely to have lost its elasticity (hardened) due to the heat emitted from the air pump.
jhansolo
Thanks for all the replies ...

QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Wed 11 Aug 2004 11:40 am)
If I guess correctly, the "blue soft" airline tubing you are using is the newer type made of silicon.  Those typical clear harder ones are made of plastic (of some sort.)

The silicon type, I find better in staying connected.  They were made specifically to stay soft (and hence huggy) instead of harden up over-time and lose the grib.

So I'm guessing (again!?) that the fault may lies in your Rena's air-outlet tip.  Is the tip oily and so slippery?  Use some thinner to carefully remove the oil if you can. 

*


Yes the air line or tubing is the newer type made of silicon. It is wonderful and I really don't notice any smell.

As for the outlet tip, during my last water change ... no there is no oil or whatever, but cleaned it anyway.

QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Wed 11 Aug 2004 11:43 am)

Does the air pumping out from the Rena flow freely?  It could be your airstone is clogged and the back-pressure created is so great the connection slips.
*


Well the stone can't be clog as they are new.

QUOTE(cpiw2002 @ Wed 11 Aug 2004 07:13 pm)
After cleaning,before slipping on the air tube simply snip off the part that was previously attached to the inlet as that portion is likely to have lost its elasticity (hardened) due to the heat emitted from the air pump.
*


Done that as well ...

I also wrote to Rena and got a reply to add a elastic band, well I figure the main reason for the back pressure is because I place the pump below the water line. Let me do what they recommanded first and see how it goes.
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(jhansolo @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 11:10 am)
I also wrote to Rena and got a reply to add a elastic band, well I figure the main reason for the back pressure is because I place the pump below the water line.  Let me do what they recommanded first and see how it goes.
*

Elastic band? A cool looking high-end airpump now looks like it belongs to a nerd. rofl2.gif

About placing below water line. That's a big no-no, you know? When the pump is turned off, effectively the airline tubing becomes a siphoning tube and will draw water into the pump, short-circuiting it. It's a fire hazard! If you don't have a choice but to place it below water line, get a one-way check valve for airpumps asap. It contains a small trap door that prevents water from flowing back into your air pump when power outages occur. It costs about $2 a piece. Most LFS will have it on sale.
square_guy
QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 11:26 am)
Elastic band?  A cool looking high-end airpump now looks like it belongs to a nerd.  rofl2.gif

About placing below water line.  That's a big no-no, you know?  When the pump is turned off, effectively the airline tubing becomes a siphoning tube and will draw water into the pump, short-circuiting it.  It's a fire hazard!  If you don't have a choice but to place it below water line, get a one-way check valve for airpumps asap.  It contains a small trap door that prevents water from flowing back into your air pump when power outages occur.  It costs about $2 a piece.  Most LFS will have it on sale.
*



not really. the airline tubing will only becomes a siphon if there is a transient negative pressure (when the pump is switch off) in the tubing that is large enough to suck water above the waterline to the topmost portion of the tubing. i haven't see this happen at all even though my airpump is always below the waterline.

disclaimer: i am not responsible for any fire that results from this laugh.gif
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(square_guy @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 12:06 pm)
not really. the airline tubing will only becomes a siphon if there is a transient negative pressure (when the pump is switch off) in the tubing that is large enough to suck water above the waterline to the topmost portion of the tubing. i haven't see this happen at all even though my airpump is always below the waterline.

disclaimer: i am not responsible for any fire that results from this  laugh.gif
*

It has happened to me (although I caught it soon and no serious damage done.)

But come to think about it, you're right. Not only is a negative pressure (effectly priming the siphoning action) is a pre-requisite, the airpump's assembly must also "leak" and not air-tight. The later can happen when the pump is of low quality or the rubber diaphram worn out over time.

Nevertheless, the one-way check valve is a small investment for a peace of mind. yes.gif

I often wonder if it reduces the pump's output though....
jhansolo
QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 11:26 am)
Elastic band?  A cool looking high-end airpump now looks like it belongs to a nerd.  rofl2.gif

get a one-way check valve for airpumps asap.  It contains a small trap door that prevents water from flowing back into your air pump when power outages occur.  It costs about $2 a piece.  Most LFS will have it on sale.
*


That's why I'm very very reluctant to do what they recommanded.

Square guy is right about the negative pressure ... I do have the check valve which I only use when I'm away. It reduces the pressure greatly.

Rena in the installation guide described in detail about the loop and it works, no back flow of water.

I'll figure something out rather than a elastic band wink.gif
mountain
THx man .. dumbo here has both his airpump on the floor .. without a check valve ..

duds .. how does a check valve looked like?? i prob go grab one the next round
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(jhansolo @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 12:59 pm)
Rena in the installation guide described in detail about the loop and it works, no back flow of water.
*

What loop? Can I trouble you to describe it? It sounds like a better option than a check valve especially since the later reduces pressure.
jhansolo
Here is the link look at fig 3

http://www.renapump.com/RA400_Instructions.pdf
white horse T1
QUOTE(jhansolo @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 12:59 pm)
Rena in the installation guide described in detail about the loop and it works, no back flow of water.

*


yeah i did see it in the RENA guide. it is a good alternative to check valve and a zero cost option too
CP
I too have my Rena airpump 3ft below tank ie 5ft below water surface level.
Initially install check valve,first time the valve produced whistling sound.Purchased another set of check valve (some call it one way valve),no sound,but found air supply reduced drastically.Currently not using any valve, so far no problem when I off the pump occasionally (when feeding tubifex),but I do have a loop as described,ie just let the hose elevate abt 6 inches above water surface before turning down into the air pump.

Me also better type in disclaimer : I am not responsible for any mishaps if anyone chooses to follow this method.
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(jhansolo @ Mon 16 Aug 2004 04:19 pm)

Thank you!

IPB Image

The "loop" in figure 3 is easy to do! You just saved bro mountain a trip to the LFS and a few bucks.

I looked at figure 5 and I laughed, recalling recently someone did something as silly but he submerged a brand new external UV filter into his tank, shorting the thing immediately. I believe the shock treatment (probably costing about $100) did made him wiser and he now wears a new afro hairdo too. biggrin.gif
jhansolo
Cool! I thought this is public knowledge the loop thing.

I use a small cable tie to secure the loop and a plastic cloth peg.

Cheers
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