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Full Version: What Is The Tap Water Ph At Your Area? Ph 8.8?
RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Green Water, Filtration and Tank Setup
ranchu8
Hi all

I recently bought a hanna ph pen and was shocked to find that the ph of my tap water (Toh Yi area, upper bukit timah) is around 8.8. ohmy.gif Would the members of this board kindly comment on whether this is usual? Is this new-water?

What is the tap water ph in your area?

regards
The Matrix
QUOTE(ranchu8 @ Sat, 19 Mar 2005 3:01 am)
Hi all

I recently bought a hanna ph pen and was shocked to find that the ph of my tap water (Toh Yi area, upper bukit timah) is around 8.8.  ohmy.gif Would the members of this board kindly comment on whether this is usual? Is this new-water?

What is the tap water ph in your area?

regards
*


you are drinking it, so dun worry so much.
pH is never the same in all parts of Singapore.
GF Lover
QUOTE(The Matrix @ Sat, 19 Mar 2005 8:57 am)
you are drinking it, so dun worry so much.
pH is never the same in all parts of Singapore.
*

Our water system runs on a network. If one area short of water, they will divert water from another area. The main thing to worry is not the pH but the chloramine. Soon all the water treatment plants in Singapore will be converting to chloramine. This was a result of a study on the water quality because of the SARS outbreak. Chloramine holds its effectiveness longer than chlorine. Many hobbists already kena entire stock wiped out after water change.
CP
QUOTE(ranchu8 @ Sat, 19 Mar 2005 3:01 am)
Hi all

I recently bought a hanna ph pen and was shocked to find that the ph of my tap water (Toh Yi area, upper bukit timah) is around 8.8.  ohmy.gif Would the members of this board kindly comment on whether this is usual? Is this new-water?

What is the tap water ph in your area?

regards
*


7.5 to 7.8 Woodlands.

Did u calibrate your pH pen?
ranchu8
Thanks. I callibrated the pen.

er, I'm not concerned with my drinking of the water. It's for the ranchu and the ph in my tank has not come down, around 8.8 unsure.gif afraid if the ammonia level goes up, so far has not exceeded 0.25 ppm

For the members of this board, please let me know the ph of your tap water if you have the info. Tks.
CP
You may wish to check this out:

http://www.RafflesGold.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=566
GFSLAVE
QUOTE(ranchu8 @ Sat, 19 Mar 2005 3:01 am)
Hi all

I recently bought a hanna ph pen and was shocked to find that the ph of my tap water (Toh Yi area, upper bukit timah) is around 8.8.  ohmy.gif Would the members of this board kindly comment on whether this is usual? Is this new-water?

What is the tap water ph in your area?

regards
*



I bought a pH pen yesterday and tested the water (after calibration) which was around 7.7 - Pasir Ris. smile.gif
wongcp21
Hi, I am a newbie....

pH 7.8 - 8.1 Bt Timah area, near Shelford Road.....
infodog
I get around 7.8 - 8.2
ranchu8
Thanks all for the help good.gif
CP
Check the pH of your existing tank water before performing water change.If the tank pH is in the low 7s or lower and tap is 8.8 the consequences can be fatal.


Which brings me to a question to all bros:
Suppose the pH in my area is in the mid 7s and all of a sudden this week it reaches 8.8.That means my tank water is mid 7s and tap is near 9.How do I perform a water change?

Do I:
1)Lower the tap water using those "pH down" products before performing the change , OR
2)Do partial changes daily till the tank water is close to tap water OR
3) do a combination of (1) and (2)

But one thing for sure - I will call and f--k PUB first. biggrin.gif
CyberET
wacko.gif
The Matrix
QUOTE(cpiw2002 @ Sun, 20 Mar 2005 11:33 pm)
Check the pH of your existing tank water before performing water change.If the tank pH is in the low 7s or lower and tap is 8.8 the consequences can be fatal.
Which brings me to a question to all bros:
Suppose the pH in my area is in the mid 7s and all of a sudden this week it reaches 8.8.That means my tank water is mid 7s and tap is near 9.How do I perform a water change?

Do I:
1)Lower the tap water using those "pH down" products before performing the change , OR
2)Do partial changes daily till the tank water is close to tap water OR
3) do a combination of (1) and (2)

But one thing for sure - I will call and f--k PUB first. biggrin.gif
*



PUB will ask u, after a meal, what drink did you flush down your throat.

Our human body system able to take the extremes. Our tap water can change, and as long as human can consume, WHO guideline do not spell out a must for municipal drinking water standard to be suitable for fishes or dogs or birds.
ranchu8
From my understanding, it is true that fish can adapt to difference in ph if the change is gradual and there is negligible ammonia. The critical part is when there is a change from low ph to high ph because ammonia toxicity increases when the ph increases. So the greater danger is when tank water has low ph and tap water has high ph.

For cpiw 2002's query, I would do number 2 because there is less hassle and it would bring my tank water closer to my tap water, making life much easier. But as said, concern would be when ammonia in my tank is not 0.

Do any members have high ph like 8.8 in their tap water, like mine?? oranda.gif

Edited my email above by inserting the following from a website: http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/4468/faq_care.html

7. Should I try to adjust the pH of my water?

No. I have successfully kept goldfish in pH 6.5 and pH 8.5 water. Your life will be wretched unless you get your fish used to the natural pH of your water. The main problem is that pH adjustments tend initially not to be stable; the pH bounces back towards the original pH after adjustment, requiring multiple treatments. Goldfish should not be subjected to this.
goldrush
Yo Cpiw stop being crude but bear in mind that municipal water are always monitored and regulated with regards to HUMAN consumption only and not calibrated with other animals in mind.So what is fit for human drinking does not mean it is fit for fish rearing and thus do not call PUB for this grievance!
This bring me to the topic on water purifiers and its effect on aquatic keeping.The water purifiers are to me a misnomer .Human water purifiers in the market boast of the likes of activated charcoals,resins and even REDOX incorporation to generate what is deemed healthy water but these can have detrimental effects on fish keeping as such may deplete or interfere with ion exchanges with resultant fluctuation of the biochemical profile of the water.Maybe I'll try to write something on this in the near future....

regards

goldrush
The Matrix
QUOTE(ranchu8 @ Mon, 21 Mar 2005 11:39 am)
Do any members have high ph like 8.8 in their tap water, like mine??  oranda.gif

Edited my email above by inserting the following from a website: http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/4468/faq_care.html

7. Should I try to adjust the pH of my water?

No. I have successfully kept goldfish in pH 6.5 and pH 8.5 water. Your life will be wretched unless you get your fish used to the natural pH of your water. The main problem is that pH adjustments tend initially not to be stable; the pH bounces back towards the original pH after adjustment, requiring multiple treatments. Goldfish should not be subjected to this.
*



Russ Taylor has given a good advice. Dun be bothered by all these ph thing.

if the ph at your area is really fluctuating too much, then u just get the fish out to a pail with the old tank water during water change, fill the tank up and slowly pour in new tank water to the pail. allow the fish to adapt to the new water. just a few liters of water wasted is better than doing a lot of weird things.
CP
QUOTE(The Matrix @ Mon, 21 Mar 2005 10:43 am)
PUB will ask u, after a meal, what drink did you flush down your throat.

Our human body system able to take the extremes. Our tap water can change, and as long as human can consume, WHO guideline do not spell out a must for municipal drinking water standard to be suitable for fishes or dogs or birds.
*




QUOTE(goldrush @ Mon, 21 Mar 2005 12:30 pm)
Yo Cpiw stop being crude but bear in mind that municipal water are always monitored and regulated with regards to HUMAN consumption only and not calibrated with other animals in mind.So what is fit for human drinking does not mean it is fit for fish rearing and thus do not call PUB for this grievance!
regards

goldrush
*


sad.gif(
Okie dokie.

I have seen with my very own eyes a fluctuation of water parameters wiping out half the livestock in a LFS during water change.The owner suspected a sudden rise in either chlorine or chloramine levels and PUB was called.The reply (I presume a standard govt reply) was that they have tested the water and it conforms to WHO guidelines for human consumption.

True, our tap water is for drinking not fishkeeping but what I am saying is that PUB should be informed so that they realise it may be a problem.
The Matrix
QUOTE(cpiw2002 @ Mon, 21 Mar 2005 6:20 pm)
PUB should be informed  so that they realise it may be a problem.
*



hahahaha .... when did they start to change chlorine to chloramines ? when did they started to use newater ?

kekekekeke .... they will not even tell the public.
ranchu8
QUOTE(ranchu8 @ Mon, 21 Mar 2005 11:39 am)

7. Should I try to adjust the pH of my water?

No. I have successfully kept goldfish in pH 6.5 and pH 8.5 water. Your life will be wretched unless you get your fish used to the natural pH of your water. The main problem is that pH adjustments tend initially not to be stable; the pH bounces back towards the original pH after adjustment, requiring multiple treatments. Goldfish should not be subjected to this.
*



I don't think Russ Taylor suggested that one should not be bothered by ph. He also has the following to say in the same webpage:

"Goldfish can survive quite well in almost any pH, but they can be harmed by sudden changes of more than a few tenths.

So test your tap water, to make sure it does not need any special aging: test pH right from the tap, then aerate in a bucket overnight and test again.

Assuming there is nothing complex about your water, you will do changes using a water changing device or with buckets. For small tanks, two 5 gallon buckets will do the job. Use one to store fresh, dechlorinated water of the same temperature as the tank. Use the second to siphon old water into.

The water changers are tubing arrangements that hook up to a faucet. They can be wasteful of water, but are very much simpler than carrying buckets. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

For big tanks (say 40 gallons and above), I use a bucket and hoses. I siphon some tank water into a bucket, catch the fish by hand and put them into the bucket. Then I turn off the filter, siphon out the tank, and refill directly by hose from the faucet. I add the dechlorinator directly to the tank as the water is going in. Make sure the temperature is the same as the bucket water. I usually leave the tank to settle down for 20 minutes or so, then turn on the filter and put the fish back in."

He also said the following about ammonia:

"I tend to be a very quantitative hobbyist. I make extensive use of test kits to calibrate myself to what care a given set of fish in a particular tank need. I typically change water when the nitrate level is between 20 and 30 mg/l (or ppm). This is for established tanks; for a tank that is "cycling" (developing the bacterial cultures that perform biofiltration), I change enough water to keep the ammonia below 1.0 ppm and the nitrites well below 0.5ppm."
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