Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Tank Size......east Vs West (generally )
RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Fancy Goldfish
stooeygee
Since ive kept goldfish ive been learning from two sites ( one mainly from the western hemisphere and the other from the eastern hemisphere).

In the west acceptable voluume to keep goldfish is 10 us gallons or 38 litres

So why in the east acceptable levels are 26-27 gallons or around the 100 ltr mark?

I want tensure my fish are given the OPTIMUM water conditions so would love your advice on growth etc.........
CP
Common tank sizes here comes in feet; 2ft tank,3ft tank or 4ft tank is the most common.Only mad people like me have a 7ft tank.

The volumes of 2,3 and 4 feet tanks are approx. 100l,200l to 400l respectively, depending on the width and height.

There are people in the east who keeps goldfish in 50l tank as well - they are the ones that tell you that goldfish are hard to keep,succumb to diseases easily and their maximum size is 3 inches.It is very difficult to convince hobbyist here in the east to keep 80 to 100l per fish, believe me.
The Matrix
QUOTE(stooeygee @ Thu, 27 Oct 2005 3:00 am)
Since ive kept goldfish ive been learning from two sites ( one mainly from the western hemisphere and the other from the eastern hemisphere).

In the west acceptable voluume to keep goldfish is 10 us gallons or 38 litres

So why in the east acceptable levels are 26-27 gallons or around the 100 ltr mark?

I want tensure my fish are given the OPTIMUM water conditions so would love your advice on growth etc.........
*



EXTREMELY GOOD QUESTION !!! And I have yet to see anyone here really ask this.

Let's not compare about east and west practises, there is only 1 - Goldfish.
Me go conference, maybe by the time, someone answered you.

cheers.
peter porker
QUOTE(CP @ Thu, 27 Oct 2005 10:06 am)
Common tank sizes here comes in feet; 2ft tank,3ft tank or 4ft tank is the most common.Only mad people like me have a 7ft tank.

The volumes of 2,3 and 4 feet tanks are approx. 100l,200l to 400l respectively, depending on the width and height.

There are people in the east who keeps goldfish in 50l tank as well - they are the ones that tell you that goldfish are hard to keep,succumb to diseases easily and their maximum size is 3 inches.It is very difficult to convince hobbyist here in the east to keep 80 to 100l per fish, believe me.
*



I blame it on LillianToo. Also, in her book, she mentioned that its alright for one or a few of your 9 to die on you. She says to replace it as the dead goldfish have diverted some major illness or misfortune from you.

Jeez. How about your fish died because they have been swimming in their own shit for too long?
goldrush
Now the ratio of volume to fish is just a recommended guide and not an absolute requirement.A lot of other factors pertaining to water quality maintenance and control are of greater importance than a given volume per fish.Suffice to say,with greater volume to fish ratio,it gives the keeper greater room for manipulation in terms of water husbandry with less stress for the fish associated with resultant changes.And if growth is your concern,a larger space(volume)would allow better growth rate and perhaps reduce the impact of growth retarding hormones(pheromones)from exercising their influence.

goldrush
Daryl
Exactly correct. Also remember that this "rule of thumb", given to newbies of 10gallons per fish is just that - a general rule. Most people who need this "rule" also have tiny fish- commonly 3 inches and under. They can do acceptably by that. Many people just starting in the hobby are quite shocked by the volumes needed - they accept the 10gallon suggestion more readily at first. After a time, when their fish grow and do better, they are more open to the suggestion of more volume per fish.

Those who are truly interested in the fish to the degree found here on this forum quickly discover the advantages of larger volumes of water. Ask anyone in the "west" who actually raises or shows quality fish and you will find that they would be horrified at only 10 gallons per fish.
stooeygee
QUOTE
Ask anyone in the "west" who actually raises or shows quality fish and you will find that they would be horrified at only 10 gallons per fish


I dont doubt that for one minute. I just found it quite incredible that on using the forums in the mainly western website it was never ever mentioned about suggesting a larger volume of water per fish. In fact the only mention " rule "was 10 gallon for fancy and 20 gallon for comet/commons etc......


QUOTE
Most people who need this "rule" also have tiny fish- commonly 3 inches and under


Damn right . I almost fell of my chair seeing some of the pictures of fish on this site ! some are bigger than my cat hysterical.gif
The Matrix
Bruce did not grow in 10gal tank. Several hundred gal in fact.
The oldest fish lives in a small 10gal tank and not grown much since years ago. I think it is still alive.

Generally, a 10gal is enough. The problem is how many really survive long enough and grow to the fish maximum potential. In many cases, thru correspondents, fishes seldom grow above 6". Unless one buy a large fish put in a small tank. Even if it does, the fish is never a show grade fish or maintain well. Yes, 10gal is good enough, just for survival.

Changing water is quite a sensitive topic. Most of the time, articles are talking about small change, but none mentioned the toxicity of the incremental seems-like-non-harmful nitrates. It's not harmful indeed. But many fail to state the danger of keeping in high concentration. A small change reduced the poisoning immediately but not arresting the increasing problem. Well, at least in RG, people here do put a stop plug at a certain level of nitrates.

Is 10% enough or more better ? Well, let the test kits and the fishes tell you. Ask the writer of the article you read, not follow blindly. Experience and witness the change in fish will tends to convince a serious keeper.

It voice down to individual keeper. Serious keeper or just a causal display setup to brighten the house.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2017 Invision Power Services, Inc.