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RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Green Water, Filtration and Tank Setup
small_ranchu
Hello green water guru,
I recently brew green water in my 10 gallons tank with a lot of light and air circulation. I am ready to transfer green water into my 29, 55 gallons tank. Here are my questions (I can't find any though smile.gif ) for indoor setup

1. what is the size of your tank ( l x w x h ) and what is the wattages of the lighting system?
2. how long do you turn on the light per day?

Thanks.
The Matrix
QUOTE(small_ranchu @ Mon, 11 Jun 2007 4:48 am) *

Hello green water guru,
I recently brew green water in my 10 gallons tank with a lot of light and air circulation. I am ready to transfer green water into my 29, 55 gallons tank. Here are my questions (I can't find any though smile.gif ) for indoor setup

1. what is the size of your tank ( l x w x h ) and what is the wattages of the lighting system?
2. how long do you turn on the light per day?

Thanks.


Use a simple rule .... 0.7 Watts per L of water at a minimum of 6500K white light full spectrum at uninterrupted 8 hours daily.
desireless
I reccommended 8 hours daily.

http://www.rafflesgold.com/forums/index.ph...mp;showentry=57
small_ranchu
0.7 watts per liter which means I need 145 watts for my 55 gallons tank. For a fact, Is green water is high light require algae? The requirement is almost identical to the requirement of high light plant. smile.gif



On the other hand, I am looking for low cost indoor green water setup smile.gif
desireless
Don't know the maths for calculating the wattage but it is important that you use powerful plant light for green water purpose. For indoor purpose (typical 2ft or 2ft tank), MH lamp will be quite luxurious already. Take note of my journal that I have used PL lamp of 55 watts for a 2ft tank (40 litres, 10 gallon). Then I shifted to a tub of about 60-70 litres water and still using the same light set.
small_ranchu
Thanks Ken,
I guess I have to do research on my own. Now I have two small ryukin in my 29 gallons(110 liters) tank. And I have two T5 planted lights on the tank(36 watts). The tank is getting green in two days; I can stay see the fish though. The parameter is good (ammonia 0, nitrite 0, nitrate 0). Let's see what happen at the end. smile.gif
GlassGoldfish
QUOTE(small_ranchu @ Mon, 11 Jun 2007 11:47 pm) *

On the other hand, I am looking for low cost indoor green water setup smile.gif


Place the tank near a sunny window! That's worked for me before.
small_ranchu
Unfortunately I live in a room with very small windows.
small_ranchu
The first time I am using green water for second week.

horayyyy....

Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0 and Nitrate 0 (how can u achieve it in clear water? lol)

But 1 problem.
I saw blood patch on the scale and dorsal fin. Any idea why does it happen?
I buffer my water with Baking Soda as well. PH become 7.4 from 6.8(Tap water).
Thanks.
GlassGoldfish
to me, bloody patch (or streaks??) on fins indicate stress and poor water quality. Perhaps there was an ammonia spike while the green water was taking over??

To me, a bloody patch on a scale is more serious, as it indicates a bacterial infection. Are there any sponge filters, or other filters in place? I had a re-curring bloody scale appear on a ranchu last year, and I think what did it was funky old pads in the filter. What you've got to figure out is where bacteria are coming from.

Your tap water could be irritating the fish, too. How to you implement a water change? Are you able to season the water?
small_ranchu
In the green water tank, I don't have any filter except the air stone. Here is my water change method:
1. I take out water from the tank until 10-15% is left
2. I put the appropriate amount of Prime into the tank
3. While I am filing the tank, I add baking soda solution(water + BS) slowly.

Thanks.
bekko
Have you ever tired aerating your tap water (without baking soda) for an hour or so and then checking the pH again?

-steve
small_ranchu
No, I've never done that b4. Is there any effect by doing that?
bekko
Your tap water may have an excess of carbon dioxide gas (CO2). Carbon dioxide is a weak acid. Once the water is aerated the excess carbon dioxide is driven out and the pH stabilizes above 7. In some areas, the water is so soft that baking soda is needed to prevent a pH crash. However, this is rare and most water already has enough alkalinity.

The fish are sensitive to changes in temperature and pH. It might help if you prepare the new water in a separate container the day before a water change. Dechlorinate and aerate the water overnight before using it. Don't use the baking soda if you do not need it.

-steve
small_ranchu
Steve,
Thanks for explanation. My tap water PH is about 6.7, so I raise it to 7.2 by adding baking soda.

Is there any alternate way instead of aging water? To age water for 29 gallon tank is easy, but I don't have space for 90 gallon tank.

Thanks
Fred
gohks
SM,
Did you check the hue of the greens. If water too green, there would be plenty of O2 and CO2 release in the day and night respectively. I am not sure what's the impact on the pH if you have this swing.
I think for green water, we also need buffering yes.gif
small_ranchu
Thanks for the reply. My water is not super green since the FL light is not that strong. I am checking the water parameter every morning and every evening. Ammonia, nitrite, nitrate doesn't exist in the setup and PH is swinging between 7.2(early morning)-7.4(evening).

I put baking soda for buffering smile.gif
gohks
SM,
Possible to show pic of your blood streak affected fish. Sometime it could be just matter of judgement as blood streak particularly prominent on long fins and white fish yes.gif
small_ranchu
Unfortunately, Blood streak is gone after 2 days treatment. I mean very few are left but impossible to capture with my camera ability.
Thank you.
* It's not a white fish. It is a baby fish with baby color.
small_ranchu
I found a similar problem picture from my old pic album. Take a look
IPB Image



one more
IPB Image
gohks
Can't see any red streaks blush.gif Looks like some pinkish hue caused by red colour enhancement food laugh.gif
small_ranchu
Look at the edge between tail and body. You will see red patch on her body.
small_ranchu
One problem arise, after 2 days of water change, I still see ammonia in my green water tank. The tank is pretty green though.


Size of tank. 29 gallons
no of fish 2 (4" each)
feeding amount 3 times a day for 1 min duration

Thanks guys
gohks
What time you measure the ammonia?
small_ranchu
once in the morning, follow by the noon and finally evening
desireless
Did you do a check if your green water has collaposed? Take a container (about 2 gallons) and scoop a small amount of it, leave it without aeration or disturbance for about 20mins. See if the algae settle to the bottom with clear water on top.
small_ranchu
I just did a testing. Only very few algae is sitting at the bottom. Should I give the tank more light?
desireless
If it is very green, then the presence of ammonia could be due to 2 reasons:
1) Algae at the bottom water that is not receiving the enough amount of light (due to insufficient light penetration) is undergoing reverse photosynthesis.
2) There is substantial amount of algae cells undergoing the last "death phase" of growth cycle.

You'll probably need to do another water change and seed much lesser. Just slight tint of green will do. As bekko explained quite some time back, you need to keep the green water algae in the initial phase (where the cells are rapidly splitting and increasing) for as long as possible before you need to do next water change. That's one of the basics to the control of green water wink.gif
d_golem
Told ya Fred that 20% seed is a bit too much tongue.gif but I dunno it causes a slight ammonia reading although I was on the right track saying that it has to do with dead algae cells.
small_ranchu
QUOTE
As bekko explained quite some time back, you need to keep the green water algae in the initial phase (where the cells are rapidly splitting and increasing) for as long as possible before you need to do next water change.

Does it mean, I don't need to do WC once a week? Should I change it when the water is getting very dark according to the chart? wow a lot of new thing to learn. Thanks my friends.. smile.gif

QUOTE
Told ya Fred that 20% seed is a bit too much tongue.gif but I dunno it causes a slight ammonia reading although I was on the right track saying that it has to do with dead algae cells.

The problem for me is I don't have natural sun light. And my light source is not very strong. I want to achieve the Green water with minimum light for indoor setting. Thanks my friend.. smile.gif
desireless
Yes water change is done based on the shade of green.

So long as you seed, there is no worry that the water won't turn green with minimum light (provided your fishes are healthy). Problem with minimum light sets in only when the water turns to the darker shade of green.
small_ranchu
QUOTE
As bekko explained quite some time back, you need to keep the green water algae in the initial phase (where the cells are rapidly splitting and increasing) for as long as possible before you need to do next water change.

I would like to read this info but couldn't find it though. Can you please point to the correct link? Thanks.
goldrush
QUOTE(small_ranchu @ Mon, 09 Jul 2007 10:32 pm) *

I would like to read this info but couldn't find it though. Can you please point to the correct link? Thanks.



hi.gif Maybe he is referring to this link

http://www.rafflesgold.com/forums/index.ph...ost&p=36996
small_ranchu
Thanks guys.. smile.gif
small_ranchu
When you have to treat the whole green water tank for parasite (Ick or fluke) or bacteria, how do you guys do it? In regular clear water setup, you can just dump salt or medicine into the tank. For some medicine, they won't effect the tank cycle. Are we doing the same thing for green water setup?

Does green water fail when using medicine? I know different medicine has different effect. I just want to know in general for the future.

Thanks.
lnicky
QUOTE(small_ranchu @ Tue, 12 Jun 2007 2:47 am) *

0.7 watts per liter which means I need 145 watts for my 55 gallons tank. For a fact, Is green water is high light require algae? The requirement is almost identical to the requirement of high light plant. smile.gif
On the other hand, I am looking for low cost indoor green water setup smile.gif


Can we use high pressure sodium (HPS) lamp for indoor green water setup??? it is rich in the red end of the light spectrum and used in hydroponic system.

It's a bit cheaper than a metal halide so I am thinking to try it.
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