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RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Green Water, Filtration and Tank Setup
krbender24
Hi everyone,

Over the course of my time in the goldfish hobby I have read many articles and posts regarding different perspectives on water types but have yet to come across any that favor mud ponds.

Many are familiar with the famous mud koi ponds in the Niigata region of Japan. I have read many articles that speak of many benefits from mud ponds and I wonder if anyone has heard or tired to raise goldfish in similar conditions?

Also, I am familiar with montmorillonite clay and am curious how this is viewed by many keepers. I have come across foods that contain this clay and some advise mixing these clays with food or adding them on a weekly or monthly basis to ponds.

I understand and value everyones different methods of keeping and would love to hear about any experiences!
CP
I am of the opinion that mud ponds are good for goldfish but it is next to impossible to setup a mud pond for us hobbyists, especially in land scarse Singapore.

However, most commercial breeding farms in China are mud ponds the size of football fields.And the size of the fishes are simply amazing!
goldrush
You can read abit more here

http://www.rafflesgold.com/forums/index.ph...275&hl=clay


As written,I'm still using clay on a regular basis as a feed as well as a water conditioner.
bekko
Mud ponds stocked at low density are great for goldfish growth. With the goon nutrition and low density, health is usually good too.

The problems arise when it comes time to take the fish out of the pond. Catching them all with a dip net does not work if it's a big pond. If you have ever seen a mud pond being harvested with a seine and then by draining you wonder how anything survives. It works for hardy food fish, koi and small goldfish which have time to repair before they are sold. However , large goldfish loose scales and break fin spines so easily that many will have noticeable damage by the time it's over. A concrete pond is much easier on the fish and easier for the fish keeper.

You may not be satisfied with a small mud pond as an ornamental pond either. The density would need to be very low - lower than most people would like in an ornamental pond. At normal densities, the fish keep the bottom so stirred up that that you cannot see anything. When I tried it, the visibility was about two inches. Remove the fish and visibility quickly returns to normal.

-steve
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