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CnT
I hv a red/white sakura ranchu with just one scale on its back tats black color. Can i pluck/pull out tis scale n hope its regrows into red/white color? Is it relatively easy to pull out with a tweezer? then treat with some anti-bacteria meds.

Anyone done tis operation b4?

Thanks sweatingbullets.gif
CP
I think its kinda cruel to pluck the scale just because its of a different colour.And,the scale would not grow back.

Here is a similiar operation performed by Goldrush,but for treatment of ulcers:
http://www.rafflesgold.com/forums/index.ph...21&hl=ulcer

I guess the most difficult part lies in the possesion of a pair of steady hands. biggrin.gif
CyberET
pluck out no problem, but it may not grow back with the color you have in mind. its a gamble, but u can try.

scales will grow back, but it takes time and good water parameters
CnT
Thank you for ur kind responses. Still researching about tis operation. Hope someone with experience in tis can share knowledge, like how easy for the scales to come out, ie. pull hard or slowly ease out? Best way to hold fish steady?

The link on ulcer operation is very useful. Mucho thanks for it.

Thanks again sweatingbullets.gif
CyberET
quite easy with a tweaser..
but sometimes its not the scale, but the skin beneath it thats the color.. so you may need to scrap the skin..
then again, how nicely it'll heal/turn out to be, depends on your skill as well..
bekko
I am interested in how this turns out. Calico goldfish have nacreous (transparent) scales, often with metallic scales mixed in among the transparent scales. The pigment we see lies in the skin beneith transparent scales, but within the scale itself for metallic scales. However, black does not normally appear in metallic-scaled goldfish so, like CyberET says, the pigment may be in the skin under the scale in this case.

Koi breeders often do "winter work" where they modify the pattern by scraping off red pigment. This is particularly easy to do on the head where there are no scales. It is reported to be a fairly simple task to make a tancho spot more round and symetrical by scraping with a sharp implement. We hear that black shimmies on koi can be scraped away. I have never really understood this as the pigment should be on the underside of the metallic scale in the dermis, not on top of the scale in the epidermis. There are also reports of using lemon juice or a mild acid to denature the pigments and turn an area white. Jikin breeders routinely "make" fish by removing errant red scales leaving only the twelve points of red behind. However, like koi, jikin only have metallic scales.

Another thing to remember is that only about 20% of a scale is exposed and most of the scale lays under the scale(s) in front of it. When a scale is lost, it leaves a void under the scales in front of it. This is a good place for bacteria to breed and create and infection. This is why jikin breeders will only remove about a half-dozen scales at one time and then give the fish a month to recover. But, goldfish accidentally loose scales during handling more often than we would like and there is seldom a problem other than creating a cosmetic fault.

-steve
Luvinmygoldies
I can't believe this thread has actually continued in an agreeable fashion in order to discuss altering a fish because of the owner's preference or to get closer to a standard of type. If it was to assist the fish from a sickness or difficulty, I can understand. But not for a cosmetic reason. Interesting and enlightening that fish are "made". I was quite naive on the subject. Ear and tail cropping done to dogs, horses deliberately bred to be so high strung they're hardly manageable without precise training and often severe riding equipment. I never thought about the goldfish!!
CyberET
wait till u see how the japanese alter their jinkins..

in fact.. by buying goldfish, you are supporting thousands of goldfish farmers, who throws away at least half of the entire brood stock as they pursue in breeding the "perfect" fancy goldfish..
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