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Full Version: Brownish Algaes, How To Get Green Ones?
RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Green Water, Filtration and Tank Setup
32Bit_Fish
Hi all,

I have a 40 gallon tank (about 150 liter?). There are brownish algaes cover the tank buttom and some on the side of the tank.

My fish won't even touch them. I heard green algaes are good for gold fish if they eat them.

My tank is indoor and it has 15 watts of flouracent light on the tank and I do not leave it on during day on week days cuz I'm at work.

Do I need to get stronger light in order to produce green algaes? please advice lighting in terms of wpg.

I have 7 GFs in the tank, 5 of them are 5" ranchus/lionchus and 2 of them 3-4" ryukins.

I do 80% w/c every other day.
Joseph**
i think to get green algae, you will definitely need a stronger light. perhaps increasing to around 50 watts should be sufficient. It also depends on how long you intent to leave the lights on during the day or evening. the shorter the light duration, the stronger the light should be.

Perhaps you can still use your 15watts light but you might need to leave it on for long hours, maybe 12- 15 hours.

There are enough ammonia producing machines in your tank to produce massive amount of algae if your light requirements are met.

Anyway good thing you mentioned that you change about 80% water everyday for your overstocked tank.
bekko
Is the brown algae diatoms (a brown slime growing on everything)? Benthic diatoms are sort of pioneer species. It is usually diatoms or green water which develop first. If it is green water you want, then use more light. If it is green wall algae you want, then just wait because it will eventually take over the diatoms.

I know small juvenile goldfish about a centimeter in length eat the brown diatoms. I suspect larger goldfish eat some too, but are unlikely to keep it under control.

-steve
32Bit_Fish
Thanks for the replies. I have tried leave the lights on for 10 hours in the past, all I got is brownish light. My 40g is 20 inches high, so I definitely need stronger light.

I am thinking about getting a PC light 150w or a MH, with stronger light, I should get green water with 8 hours a day light, right?
clm2206
QUOTE(32Bit_Fish @ Sat, 28 Feb 2009 8:38 am) *

Thanks for the replies. I have tried leave the lights on for 10 hours in the past, all I got is brownish light. My 40g is 20 inches high, so I definitely need stronger light.

I am thinking about getting a PC light 150w or a MH, with stronger light, I should get green water with 8 hours a day light, right?


I think the trick is not only wattage, but light temperature combination. I use 18,000 K combined with 4,500 K with good results in green algae wall.
32Bit_Fish
The number of K means intensity of the light. Intense light generates heat?
clm2206
QUOTE(32Bit_Fish @ Sat, 28 Feb 2009 11:26 am) *

The number of K means intensity of the light. Intense light generates heat?

Not an expert, but I've learned "temperature" measured in K means the light spectrum between red and violet. Lower K go towards red light, while higher K goes to violet light.
32Bit_Fish
I'm using a 75 watts indoor plant bulb on my 40g tank and leave it on 9 hours a day.

I'm not actually in the process of brewing the green water yet, but I want to see if I can even get some green Algaes from it. If the green algae appears in the tank, it would mean I'm not too far from green water using the same set up.

It's still a trial and error thing for me, really want to test the water before drop in by buying an expensive lighting system.

It would be great if I can get this thing to work with the cheap lighting set up.
Joseph**
i don't think you'll need to get expensive lights like MH.

this set up should work fine in getting green wall algae.

you probably wouldn't get greenwater as you change 80% of your water daily.
32Bit_Fish
I get only brownish algae after one week of lights on 9 hours a day.

I have one 75 watts light bulb and a 15 watts of factory tank light. So total of 90 watts on a 40g tall tank.

I also have a 20g heavily planted tropical tank with a 48watts T5 set up, Both tanks are running on same timer everyday. The plants grow nicely with green algae on walls of the 20g.

So I can tell right away just to compare the color of the algaes in my 20g and my goldfish 40g tank. The goldfish tank has brownish algae.

Should I increase wpg on my 40g goldfish tank? The 75 watts indoor plant bulb I'm using on my 40g seems produce weak light (specially when it is in yellowish color).

Maybe I need a stronger light (something like PC or another T5 for my 40G).
32Bit_Fish
My brownish algaes, should I increase wpg in order to get green algaes?

I have 85 watts light on this 40g and the lights on 9 hours a day 7 days a week. This pic is taken after straight 7 days of having the lights on 9 hours per day.

IPB Image


Aso pic below is my 20g heavily planted tropical tank, it has 48 watts of T5 light on, 9 hours per day 7 days a week. How can I achieve this for my goldfish tank?


IPB Image
Joseph**
i'm sure you dose fertilizers for your planted tank so i would think it helps the algae to grow better.

And the MH light would be stronger than normal PL light so perhaps your PL light tube is already old thus not as effective even though it reads 85 watts.
32Bit_Fish
QUOTE(Joseph** @ Mon, 09 Mar 2009 6:58 am) *

i'm sure you dose fertilizers for your planted tank so i would think it helps the algae to grow better.

And the MH light would be stronger than normal PL light so perhaps your PL light tube is already old thus not as effective even though it reads 85 watts.


The lights you see in my 1st pic (the goldfish tank), you are looking at 35 watts on the tank. I had this energy saving light bulb (75watts) on the tank for straight 7 days. The light bulbs marked 75 watts, but I dont think it is a really 75 watts cuz it is an energy saving bulb, the light looks weak.

Would you think a 85 watts T5 will turn the algae into green?
Joseph**
QUOTE(32Bit_Fish @ Tue, 10 Mar 2009 9:30 am) *

The lights you see in my 1st pic (the goldfish tank), you are looking at 35 watts on the tank. I had this energy saving light bulb (75watts) on the tank for straight 7 days. The light bulbs marked 75 watts, but I dont think it is a really 75 watts cuz it is an energy saving bulb, the light looks weak.

Would you think a 85 watts T5 will turn the algae into green?


yes, i used to keep planted tanks too and i found out that energy saving lights are simply not accurate when it comes to their wattage reading. And you have to use plant lights for their color spectrum.

i'm suspecting your 40g tank has less than 2wpg.

i would say you should be able to achieve green algae with stronger lights like T5.

your 20g have 2.4wpg so i think you should use that as a benchmark.
32Bit_Fish
QUOTE(Joseph** @ Mon, 09 Mar 2009 11:12 pm) *

yes, i used to keep planted tanks too and i found out that energy saving lights are simply not accurate when it comes to their wattage reading. And you have to use plant lights for their color spectrum.

i'm suspecting your 40g tank has less than 2wpg.

i would say you should be able to achieve green algae with stronger lights like T5.

your 20g have 2.4wpg so i think you should use that as a benchmark.


So I need about 100 watts light on my 40g tank, that makes 2.5 wpg. Some people suggested a strong light isn't necessary to make green algae or green water. Since I have been keeping goldfish for 1.5 yrs and never had any experience with green water in a goldfish tank. so I'm kinda in the myth of finding an solution for what I want to achieve.

Strong light that is !!! biggrin.gif
teckheng
Qns : does green algae produce foul smell ?
32Bit_Fish
QUOTE(teckheng @ Wed, 11 Mar 2009 3:12 pm) *

Qns : does green algae produce foul smell ?


No smell/foul odor that I am aware of.
teckheng
so after so many reply.... it's the Volt important or the Kelvin ?
pacificbetta
I used bulb interchangably with fluorescetn tubes, PC etc in this post.

"Watt" is the amount of electircity consumed. Electrical efficiency depends on type/age of bulb, but other things being equal, a higher wattage implies more light. You have to make sure your ballast us rated to drive the right wattage. Too low, you may not be able to fire up the bulb. Too high, you are taking a risk by overdriving the bulb and possibly shortening the lifespan of the bulb.

"Voltage" is non-negotiable. It is either 220ac (230ac) or 110ac or dc if you are using the latest LED technology. Generally when buying light fixtures from the shops you need not worry about it, since the shop already got the ballast setting tight. They better do! Bulbs are used interchangable between 110 and 220 light fixtures since it is the ballast that handle the "volt".

"Kelvin" is the color of the bulb. Higher kelvin lights are "bluer" in color, and lower K light are more yellowish. Sunlight is around 7k? (dun quite remember, been a while since I last kept fishes!) 10k gives a crips white light which I reaslly like. Goldfish, I think looks nice under yellowish light, even maybe suplemented by some red light.

Do note that intenisty of fluorescent lights drop with time. MH bulbs K rating drifts (spectrum shifts depend on type/brand of bulb). For goldfish, the way I see, if you use MH, the purpose is to "suntan" your darlings, not sure if the UV baking will help, I am a newB in goldfish!
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