Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Rise In Chlorine Level
RafflesGold Forums > Discussion Area > Fancy Goldfish
CyberET
erm.. according to pub, they will be raising chlorine/chloramine levels in the next few hours in west and central areas.. those changing water today better take note and overdose on your anti chlorine smile.gif
mrchoco
does active carbon take away chlormaine?
I prefer to use AC cos anti chlorine is chemical.
sometimes may overdose by great margin
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(CyberET @ Mon 01 Dec 2003 15:30 PM)
erm.. according to pub, they will be raising chlorine/chloramine levels in the next few hours in west and central areas.. those changing water today better take note and overdose on your anti chlorine smile.gif

Erm, where did you get this info from? unsure.gif

They didn't ICQ you, did they? I also want!
CyberET
according to this thread

QUOTE
Note from Dr Hsu of BCS in BCS forum

Got a call yesterday from someone in PUB to inform us that they will be increasing the free chlorine and chloramine level in the Western and Centralareas on 2 December 2003. Levels will be up from currently but should be less than 2 mg/L (which I think is also the same as 2 ppm).

Those of you living in these areas (Pasir panjang, Hillview, Thomson, South S'pore, etc etc) please take note and up your anti-chlorine/chloramine levels accordingly. Make sure you use a reputable brand that removes chloramine as well.
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(mrchoco @ Mon 01 Dec 2003 15:51 PM)
does active carbon take away chlormaine?
I prefer to use AC cos anti chlorine is chemical.
sometimes may overdose by great margin

There were some doubts, hearsay, myths etc...

So for the record, and you read it in RafflesGold, it does! Woo hoo!

http://www.gewater.com/library/tp/813_Chloramines_.jsp

"Activated Carbon (AC) is proven to reduce chloramine presence from 1 to 2 ppm to less than 0.1 ppm (a USP WFI requirement). The mode is similar to free aqueous chlorine destruction, however, with chloramines one encounters "by-products" of ammonia, chloride and nitrogen gas. " - GE Water Tech
LASERGUY
QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Mon 01 Dec 2003 16:47 PM)
There were some doubts, hearsay, myths etc...

So for the record, and you read it in RafflesGold, it does!  Woo hoo!

http://www.gewater.com/library/tp/813_Chloramines_.jsp

"Activated Carbon (AC) is proven to reduce chloramine presence from 1 to 2 ppm to less than 0.1 ppm (a USP WFI requirement). The mode is similar to free aqueous chlorine destruction, however, with chloramines one encounters "by-products" of ammonia, chloride and nitrogen gas. " - GE Water Tech

Basket ! mad.gif
So, my previous tub's disaster which destroyed half of best fishes was probably caused by excessive level of Chloramine ?
mrchoco
wah...
so chim...
but overall means that carbon + R.O remove the chormaines....
luckily at home using R.O water... but for human consumption..
fish i only pass through chemi-pure.... should be enough bah...
HappyBuddha
QUOTE(LASERGUY @ Mon 01 Dec 2003 20:43 PM)
Basket ! mad.gif
So, my previous tub's disaster which destroyed half of best fishes was probably caused by excessive level of Chloramine ?

Highly possible. I know you didn't test your water after the disaster struck... but frankly you probably can't detect the excessive level of chloramine anyway.

I always do 100% water change and only encountered one disaster where all the BB were killed. I'm also blaming that incident on excessive chloramine and chlorine.

Thank goodness I was advised by AT to practice soaking a bag of AC for 15 minutes after each water change; so far so good and after finding the confirmation article by GE-Water, I know why!

I love to see and hear those bubbles that rise up right after I drop a bag of AC into the water. It's like... 7-up. biggrin.gif

But I never knew when I remove the bag of AC, is it okay for the water to drip back into the tank? Would harmful chemicals flow back into the tank, or do they stick to the AC like magnets? I just try and avoid dripping too much. sad.gif
Jos Nana
QUOTE(HappyBuddha @ Tue 02 Dec 2003 09:08 AM)
Highly possible.  I know you didn't test your water after the disaster struck... but frankly you probably can't detect the excessive level of chloramine anyway.

I always do 100% water change and only encountered one disaster where all the BB were killed.  I'm also blaming that incident on excessive chloramine and chlorine.

Thank goodness I was advised by AT to practice soaking a bag of AC for 15 minutes after each water change; so far so good and after finding the confirmation article by GE-Water, I know why!

I love to see and hear those bubbles that rise up right after I drop a bag of AC into the water.  It's like...  7-up.  biggrin.gif

But I never knew when I remove the bag of AC, is it okay for the water to drip back into the tank? Would harmful chemicals flow back into the tank, or do they stick to the AC like magnets?  I just try and avoid dripping too much.  sad.gif

Using AC only to remove chloramine will take a longer time. By then, not only chloramine, other trace elements and chemicals are also remove.

Should use anti-chlorine to breakdown Chloramine into Chlorine and Ammonia. The anti-chlorine will take take care of the Chlorine and AC for 15 mins to remove the balance Ammonia.
HappyBuddha
Kekeke. Sorry sorry sorry. I didn't make it clear. I use Genesis to convert chloramine to chlorine first, and then AC to remove the chlorine and traces of left over chloramine/ammonia; just the way bro jos described. tongue.gif Missing AC during water change is unthinkable to me.

Genesis has proven to work well for me. It's cheap somemore. I don't believe in those Hagen brand stuffs many bros swear by. sad.gif
The Matrix
yo friend, not every type of AC can absorb ammonia. That's why got products like Ammo-Lock. Those AC that do the job cost a bomb, like those used in Newater plant.

Since the use of AC is a physical reaction, lower grade AC reaction time with water to pick up the unwanted organic stuffs takes quite a while. 15 mins might be a guideline, but if the water vol is really large, probably require much longer. Also AC cannot last. Once the holding property used up, it got to be throw away or find some way to discharge (use of salt). As for how long it can last, get a chemists to calculate or just use test kits.

Most AC are poor adsorption media of ammonia, but good for chloramines and chlorine ions. So if you have already dose anti-chlorine, use of AC will adsorp other minerals and any free chlorine.

Those use for human are designed for ... human of course. We take in other minerals thru the food we consumed. But for fish, if the water is too clean ( in some sense ), it's really not going to promote good health as the fish are lack of some important minerals.

Give it a thought.
CyberET
QUOTE(demekin @ Tue 02 Dec 2003 10:27 AM)
yo friend, not every type of AC can absorb ammonia. That's why got products like Ammo-Lock. Those AC that do the job cost a bomb, like those used in Newater plant.

Since the use of AC is a physical reaction, lower grade AC reaction time with water to pick up the unwanted organic stuffs takes quite a while. 15 mins might be a guideline, but if the water vol is really large, probably require much longer. Also AC cannot last. Once the holding property used up, it got to be throw away or find some way to discharge (use of salt). As for how long it can last, get a chemists to calculate or just use test kits.

Most AC are poor adsorption media of ammonia, but good for chloramines and chlorine ions. So if you have already dose anti-chlorine, use of AC will adsorp other minerals and any free chlorine.

Those use for human are designed for ... human of course. We take in other minerals thru the food we consumed. But for fish, if the water is too clean ( in some sense ), it's really not going to promote good health as the fish are lack of some important minerals.

Give it a thought.

so it would be better to utilize AC first before u use anti-chlorine right?
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2017 Invision Power Services, Inc.